Posts Tagged ‘Video Editing’

Process multi-camera shots with Final Cut Pro X: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, February 7th, 2014

Episode 79- 01

Explore DSLR Video Tips at lynda.com.


Last week Rich and I explored a multi-camera workflow process in Adobe Premiere Pro CC. This week, we’ll take a look at the same workflow using Apple’s nonlinear editing software Final Cut Pro X. We’ll dive into the Final Cut Pro X workspace and show you various processing methods for multi-camera footage and the basics of multi-camera editing.

This week you’ll learn how to

• Post-process multi-camera footage in Final Cut Pro X
• Organize multi-camera shots in Final Cut Pro X
• Synchronize audio from multi-camera shots using click tracks
• Edit multi-camera footage in Final Cut Pro X

Color correcting and adding a soundtrack to GoPro video: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, October 1st, 2013
Correcting and adding a soundtrack to GoPro videos

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.

The quadcopter crashes continue in this week’s episode of Deke’s Techniques. Join Deke as he shows you how to navigate the Timeline panel, and improve the contrast, vibrancy, and color balance of your footage with adjustment layers. (They’re not just for static imagery!) Then learn how to import an audio track, manipulate its position on the timeline, and adjust the volume of your clip. Along the way, Deke shares some invaluable time-saving shortcuts. Watch the video below to get started.

Edit a GoPro video in Photoshop: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

Editing GoPro videos in Photoshop


Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.


This is week two of the Deke’s Techniques aerial imagery challenge. Today, Deke going to show you how to add transitions to the footage we saw compiled in the last episode, with the video editing tools in Photoshop. The video starts with a dramatic liftoff and ends with a crash, but since it was shot with a GoPro camera and remote control quadcopter, no one gets hurt.

Learn how to open the video in the Timeline panel, move clips around the timeline, split clips in multiple places, and add strategic crossfades. Plus, Deke gives you a ton of shortcuts for navigating around the timeline.

Editing and animating to sound

Published by | Friday, August 23rd, 2013
Editing and Animating to Sound in After Effects

Explore this course at lynda.com.

Although I’m primarily known as an Adobe After Effects user and motion graphics artist, my background is in the music industry. Over the years I’ve found a sympathy for sound to be a big benefit to video professionals: timing animations to your project’s sound increases the impact of your visuals. Inversely, strictly focusing on the visual elements of your edits without serving the sound can distract the viewer, and dilute the overall impact.

I’ve recently distilled years of experience creating visuals to sound into a two-and-a-half-hour video course of exercises and real-world examples, Editing and Animating to Sound in Adobe After Effects. I start with the basics of learning how to “read” an audio waveform to spot the timing of beats in music, and then cut video, build animations, and even drive effects using the audio in your project. I also include a list of “magic tempos” you can hand to musicians so they can create a soundtrack at a speed that makes editing and animating easier.

Punching in on LiveView: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, July 26th, 2013

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

On this week’s episode of DSLR Video Tips, we look at a key aspect of getting great-looking shots: critical focus. Join us as we head back out on a real-world music video shoot for musician Jason Masi, and discuss time-saving techniques for achieving critical focus:

• “Punch in” on a shot in LiveView mode to achieve sharp focus.

• Use a loupe or viewfinder to magnify the image on your camera’s LCD screen, making it much easier to achieve critical focus.

• Use autofocus to quickly lock in focus prior to recording.

• Take a look at the benefits of using a field monitor, as well as an electronic viewfinder, to aid in focus. A bigger or higher resolution screen can be a huge help in getting sharp focus.

• Adjust aperture to help locking focus.

Adding a soundtrack to a video with Adobe Premiere CS6 and Audition CS6

Published by | Tuesday, June 26th, 2012

It’s a fact that Adobe Premiere CS6 and Audition CS6 tend to play nicely together. It’s this compatibility that makes it very easy and convenient to use these two applications together when working on a video project that has any sort of audio component. While Premiere does have some very basic audio editing functions, Audition is a much more fully-featured application for audio recording, editing, and mixing requirements. So, using Audition specifically for editing and mixing dialog, sound effects, music, and foley, is a good way to improve the sound of your video’s soundtrack.

After Effects Apprentice 15: Creating a 10-second promo video in After Effects

Published by | Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

In After Effects Apprentice 15: Final Project (the fifteenth, and final, course in the After Effects Apprentice series based on the second edition of Trish and Chris Meyer’s book After Effects Apprentice) you will pull together skills you’ve learned in the previous After Effects Apprentice lessons to create a real-world video promo. In the first half of the course Trish leads you through building the artwork and components used in the final piece, and then Chris demonstrates how to assemble your precompositions into a 3D world, timed to music. Skills covered include how to use masks, effects, shape layers, text, layered Illustrator files, blending modes, track mattes, collapsed transformations, nested compositions, motion blur, expressions, animation presets, audio, a 3D camera and light, and more.

Throughout the course, Trish and Chris share with you their process and thoughts as they design component elements, work towards assembling a final composition, and deal with handling change requests from clients. Chapters 11 and 12, the final two chapters of the course, are essentially mini-courses in themselves. In chapter 11, Chris breaks down several strategies for efficient rendering, including how to create versions for archiving, non-linear editors, widescreen, center cut, and the web, and chapter 12 dives into the process of recreating a dial Illustrator logo using shape and text layers inside After Effects.

Although After Effects Apprentice 15: Final Project concludes the After Effects Apprentice series, this isn’t the last we’ll be seeing of Trish and Chris as they’ve already promised to update their After Effects Apprentice book based on the next version of After Effects, and afterward will release additional Apprentice videos covering the new features, plus a new final project.

How to create a camera shake in CINEMA 4D

Published by | Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

Welcome back for another Design in Motion! This time around we’re going to have some fun in CINEMA 4D building a camera rig that will give you the ability to add very convincing multi-directional camera shake that is easy to control. Camera shake is an important component of animation. Just like motion blur, it adds a lot of realism to your movements.

Last week I introduced you to the idea of expressions in After Effects. CINEMA 4D also has an expression language—in fact—CINEMA 4D has three expression languages; Xpresso, Coffee, and Python. Don’t be alarmed, though—we won’t be writing code. We’re going to use the Xpresso language, which is a visual, node based way of making connections between objects and parameters.

Even though we’re building an easy to use camera rig, really, this technique is largely about the idea that you can use the Xpresso language to control objects and animation.

Interested in more?
• The full Design in Motion series in the Online Training Library®
• All 3D + animation courses in the Online Training Library®
• Courses on CINEMA 4D in the Online Training Library®
• Courses by Rob Garrott in the Online Training Library®

Suggested courses to watch next:
• CINEMA 4D: Rendering Motion Graphics for After Effects
CINEMA 4D R12 Essential Training
After Effects CS5.5 New Features