Posts Tagged ‘Richard Harrington’

Use a field monitor for better shots: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, September 6th, 2013

DSLR Video Tips: Using peaking and focus in red

Explore DSLR Video Tips at lynda.com.



A common phrase among DSLR pros is that “everything looks good on the back of the camera LCD.” While intended as a joke, the phrase really means that it’s hard to judge aspects of your shot like critical focus, color, and exposure using the LCD on the back of a DSLR camera. As these LCDs are generally very small, it can also be difficult for on-set clients and team members (like a focus puller) to clearly see what the camera is actually shooting.

That’s where field monitors come in. Over the past few years, lightweight field monitors offering flexible connectivity, high-resolution large screens, and extensive features have become more affordable. This week, we’ll explore the benefits of using a field monitor, including

How to shoot a product shot: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, August 30th, 2013

Take better product shots with DSLR Video Tips

Explore DSLR Video Tips at lynda.com.


Cars, phones, computers, clothes, and food are just a few examples of the plethora of products presented to us every day on TV and on the Internet. For commercials and many corporate videos, a product is the primary focus of the shot, so getting it to look its best should be your number one mission when shooting these types of projects.

Getting great product shots benefits from experience—but also a willingness to try new things with camera mounts, lighting, and motion. This week we’ll explore how to get a great product shot, including

Recording audio for an interview: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, August 23rd, 2013
Get great interview audio on location.

Explore DSLR Video Tips at lynda.com.

Having clear, crisp audio tracks is essential for effective corporate videos, commercials, documentaries—and particularly critical for interview footage. Audiences are often willing to forgive small technical mistakes with video, but far less so with problematic audio.

This week we’ll set up to shoot an interview, and look at ways to improve audio recording quality on location. It’s easy to focus solely on capturing great visuals while shooting an interview; but audio that’s hard to hear, distorted, or runs together between interviewer and subject can quickly ruin a production–and possibly even require a reshoot. To help you capture the best audio with interview footage, this week we’ll discuss:

Correcting backlit subjects: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Monday, August 19th, 2013
Correcting backlit shots

Explore DSLR Video Tips at lynda.com.

Out in the field, you’ll often find yourself in a situation where the nicest-looking shot is extremely backlit. For example, an office interview scene with bright windows behind the subject can create a challenging shooting situation. The problem with strongly backlit shots is that they make it difficult for your audience to focus on what you want them to: your subject! Worse yet, you might not even realize how backlit your shot is until you begin the postproduction process.

Shooting under bright lighting conditions: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, August 2nd, 2013

Shooting in bright conditions

Explore this course at lynda.com.


On this week’s episode of DSLR Video Tips, we look at techniques to control exposure and depth of field when shooting under bright light conditions. Outdoor lighting can be too much for a camera, so it’s important to master the exposure triangle—the critical relationship between shutter speed, aperture, and film speed (ISO). Join us as we head back out on a real-world music video shoot for musician Jason Masi, and discuss ways to achieve total control over your focus and exposure when natural lighting is in abundance:

Congratulations to the lynda.com MAX Masters!

Published by | Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

MAX Masters

Each year at the Adobe MAX conference, session attendees vote on their favorite speakers—and the top names are invited back to speak at future MAX events. We’re proud to announce that 10 of the top 22 speakers this year, or “MAX Masters,” are lynda.com authors.

We work hard to choose authors who are not only experts in their field and passionate about their subject matter, but are engaging teachers as well. We’re glad Adobe MAX audiences enjoyed their presentations as much as lynda.com members do!

Check out our training from these authors and see for yourself why they’re MAX Masters:

Anne-Marie Concepción
Bryan O’Neil Hughes
Chris Meyer
David Blatner
Deke McClelland
James Fritz
Julieanne Kost
Michael Ninness
Mordy Golding
Richard Harrington

Punching in on LiveView: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, July 26th, 2013

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

On this week’s episode of DSLR Video Tips, we look at a key aspect of getting great-looking shots: critical focus. Join us as we head back out on a real-world music video shoot for musician Jason Masi, and discuss time-saving techniques for achieving critical focus:

• “Punch in” on a shot in LiveView mode to achieve sharp focus.

• Use a loupe or viewfinder to magnify the image on your camera’s LCD screen, making it much easier to achieve critical focus.

• Use autofocus to quickly lock in focus prior to recording.

• Take a look at the benefits of using a field monitor, as well as an electronic viewfinder, to aid in focus. A bigger or higher resolution screen can be a huge help in getting sharp focus.

• Adjust aperture to help locking focus.

DSLR Video Tips: What is a follow focus?

Published by | Friday, July 19th, 2013

A DSLR follow focus system

On this week’s episode of DSLR Video Tips, we’ll look at a piece of gear called a follow focus that makes it easier to get repeatable, sharp focus. We’ll examine how a follow focus works, and techniques for using one in the field.

• Learn the benefits of using a follow focus, the essential parts of a follow focus system, and how to put one together.

• Learn how to set up marks for your talent, as well as marks on the follow focus—so that you can quickly repeat focus as objects or people move through the scene.

• Our special guest Kevin Bradley shares his techniques for operating follow focus, and Robbie tries his hand at the task of “focus puller.”

• After the shoot, we’ll head back to the studio to take a look at the results and discuss how the follow focus helped us, and what we could have done better.