Posts Tagged ‘Resume’

Using LinkedIn to manage your career

Published by | Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

Manage your career with LinkedIn

We now have two courses on LinkedIn in our library from Richard Colback, one for individuals and one for businesses.

• Up and Running with LinkedIn
• LinkedIn for Business

I took Richard’s first course myself when I was interviewing at lynda.com, and it really helped me—so in turn I’d like to share five ways I’ve learned to use LinkedIn that can help you manage your career.

Planning for 2012: Creating an effective résumé

Published by | Monday, January 2nd, 2012

Happy 2012! Now is a great time to start creating an effective résumé, and author Mariann Siegert has all the tips you’ll need to reflect on the past year’s accomplishments and use those to plan goals for the new year.

To help you start the new year off right, Mariann has shared some fantastic tips for updating both your résumé and online profile (LinkedIn, for example)—whether you’re in the market for a new job or not.

Updating Key Information

  1. Any changes to your personal information?
    1. Delete physical addresses (these are no longer used as a way of communication while job searching and may lead to identity theft). Remove your work phone number if applicable (unless you work for yourself).
    2. Remove any fax numbers—this is an antiquated means of contact.
    3. Check your contact email address and cell number to be sure they are current and accurate. Make sure you include the best way of contacting you.
  2. Have you attended any classes, workshops, or professional training courses? For example, have you completed any lynda.com courses?
  3. Have you won any awards or received any certifications?
  4. During the last year, how did you:
    1. Save or make the company money?
    2. Improve efficiency?
  5. What new software applications or programs did you use?
  6. Have you worked on any new projects?
  7. Did you receive a promotion or other special recognition?

Adding PAR Statements

Replace any clichés you find with powerful PAR statements (Problem Action Result). PAR statements take advantage of using numbers, dollar figures, and percentages to tell a business story—in this case your story. It’s a proven fact that using numbers, dollar figures, or percentages to illustrate the impact you have made in your career will have a greater impact on your audience or résumé reader by proving what you have accomplished in the past and what you can bring to the table in the future.

It’s easy to write a PAR statement. Here’s how it works:

Problem: What problem have you solved this year?

Action:  What action did you take to resolve the problem?

Result:  What was the result of your action?

Then quantify your statements with percentages, money saved, or time saved (whenever possible). Here’s an example of a PAR statement:

“Designed new Flash web site based on competitive market evaluations and client needs, resulting in a 70% increase in web site traffic and 55% profit margin for the client.”

Mariann’s tips reminded me how many wonderful developments the past year has brought and all the important work I have ahead of me. For more tips on updating your professional profiles in 2012, be sure to check out Mariann’s course, “Creating an Effective Résumé” and Richard Colback’s course “LinkedIn Essential Training.” Here’s to a fantastic and fruitful year!

Interested in more?
• All business courses on lynda.com

Suggested courses to watch next:
Creating an Effective Résumé
LinkedIn Essential Training
Pitching Projects and Products to Executives
Time Management Fundamentals

Creating an Effective Resume: A conversation with the author

Published by | Friday, April 22nd, 2011

Today we’re pleased to announce the release of a new course designed to help our members market their job skills, Creating an Effective Resume. In the course, lynda.com author Mariann Siegert shares insider recommendations—based on her experience with her own resume service and her interviews with numerous recruiters and hiring managers—for creating a resume that stands out from the crowd. The course covers how to target your resume toward specific employers; how to write your resume so that employers will want to read it; how to choose from the different ways to organize your resume and format each section; how to write titles for online searches and upload to resume banks and job sites like Monster.com; how to write cover letters and thank-you notes; and much more.

In the following video, Mariann answers resume questions that blog readers sent in or posted as comments. As you’ll see, Mariann is passionate about helping people, a passion that is reflected in all the useful tips and techniques in this course. Please let us know what you think!

Need help with your resume? Ask questions you’d like answered in our upcoming interview.

Published by | Thursday, February 17th, 2011

We’re working on a course for job seekers, and we’re wondering if you have any questions about how to improve your resume to find the job you want. I’ll be interviewing the author when they are in town recording the course, and putting that interview up here on the blog. I’d love to hear your ideas for questions. Put your questions here in this post’s comments, and we’ll answer as many as we can. (We won’t use your name or private information in our response.) Thank you!

Résumé building and interviewing tips from the lynda.com human resources team

Published by | Wednesday, February 3rd, 2010

The job market has been on many of our minds lately. You may have already checked out Laurie Burruss’ course on creating an online résumé to help you get prepared for an upcoming career change.

I spent some time with the lynda.com human resource team and asked them to share a few tips on successful interviewing to help you in your job search. Here are their top four interviewing tips.

1. Do Your Research on the Company

Before going to an interview with a potential employer, always know as much as you can about the company. Find out what drives the company. How long have they been in business? How many employees do they have? What are the main products and services? This kind of information will help you understand what they might be looking for in an individual. Employers like to know applicants have done some research rather than coming in cold.

A good resource to start with would be checking out the company’s About Us page.

The lynda.com About Us page gives an overview of the company mission and motivation, and links to further company information.