Posts Tagged ‘Nigel French’

This week’s featured five: Using InDesign master pages

Published by | Saturday, June 23rd, 2012

Recently a lynda.com member wrote in asking for advice on using master pages in InDesign. Master pages allow you to place recurring items like page numbers, footers, or headers on multiple pages throughout your document automatically. Not only does this save time and energy, but it also gives you a one-stop location for updating a title or graphic globally later on.

InDesign Master page screenshot

An example of an InDesign master page in the Pages panel.

For this week’s featured five free videos, I’ve pulled together five tutorials from five different courses to give you a solid understanding of how to use master pages in different contexts. As a bonus, you’ll gather up some other useful InDesign tips along the way, as each author explains in his own way how to work with this useful feature.

1. Introduction to master pages
If you’ve never created a master page before and you’re new to InDesign, this first video from chapter four of Up and Running with InDesign will get you started without presuming too much prior InDesign knowledge. Author Deke McClelland starts from square one, showing you how to place a graphic header and folio with page number on a newly created master, and how to apply your new master to existing pages you’ve already created in your document.


2. Setting up a master page for a magazine layout
In this excerpt from chapter one of Designing a Magazine Layout Hands-on Workshop, author Nigel French shows you how to create the master page elements that you’d want for the interior of a magazine layout. You’ll see how to consistently place the headers and footers, format them appropriately with rules and mirroring, and set up automatically updating page numbers.


3. Creating master pages strategically for a book or other long document
The next tutorial is from chapter one of our Creating Long Documents with InDesign course. When you’re working on a long document like a several-chapter book, author Mike Rankin encourages you to set up your master pages strategically by first creating a base master, then placing additional master pages with tweaks that might be desirable for different kinds of spreads like body copy and chapter openers upon that base. This strategic layering will give you greater flexibility as the project grows, and keep you from having to set up completely new masters as the project expands.


4. Overriding master page items
Of course, once in a while, you’ll find that a particular document page doesn’t work quite right with all of your master page elements. Since the role of master pages is to hold those repeating objects in place, you can’t move, delete, or even select master page items on a regular page. In this excerpt from chapter four of InDesign CS6 Essential Training, author David Blatner explains how to override a master page with the handy Command+Shift+click shortcut (Ctrl+Shift+click in Windows), which frees an object from its master and assigns it directly to the document page. At that point, with the object assigned directly to the document, you can edit or delete it as you choose. If you change your mind and want it back, David shows you how to restore master page items as well.


5. Making sure master page items aren’t covered by document objects
Finally, in episode number 39 from the InDesign Secrets series (Moving master page items to the top layer for visibility), David Blatner demonstrates how placing your master page items on the top layer of your document ensures that they aren’t covered up by the occasional graphic or text frame on a running page. If you’ve ever experienced the mysterious missing master item, then this advice is for you.


For features like master pages in InDesign that don’t quite warrant an entire lynda.com course on their own, it’s nice to be able to round up this collection of useful tutorials with different information, approaches, and bonus tips. With the depth and breadth of the lynda.com library, we can probably create dozens of other “mini-courses” by compiling excerpts from different courses. Are there any software feature that you’d like us to provide this kind of round-up for? Let us know in the comments!

Designing a book cover

Published by | Tuesday, August 31st, 2010

Whether you’re planning to publish a unique short-run novel at Blurb or need to create a brand book for your company, Designing a Book Cover Hands-On Workshop gives instructions and tips from setup to endflaps.

lynda.com author news: dinners, unicycles, Photoshop, InDesign, Twitter, Facebook, and more

Published by | Friday, August 14th, 2009
dinnershots

Top group dinner shot, left to right: Some of the lynda.com production team, Andy Ta, Roon Tamuli, Nick Brazzi, Samara Iodice, Max Smith, and Andrew Geibel. Then it's Ian Robinson (author), Megan Read (me), Nigel French (author), and Nigel's friend. Center unicycle shots: the first and second photos are the multitalented author Ian Robinson, third photo is our own Nick Brazzi. Bottom group shot, left to right: Max, Nick, Deke McClelland (author), me, Robbie Carman (author).

Over the last two weeks, we’ve had authors from all over the place in our recording booths. Ian Robinson from Virginia was in-house recording some eye-catching new Motion 4 training, Nigel French was here all the way from the UK recording an interesting new InDesign typography course, and Michael Ninness was here from Seattle recording the must-see InDesign Power Shortcuts.

This week is another busy one at lynda.com! We’ve got Robbie Carman also from Virginia recording some brand spankin’ new Color 1.5 training, Anne-Marie Concepción in from Illinois recording a cool new course about marketing your business with Twitter and Facebook, and of course, Deke McClelland from Colorado recording handfuls of must-see Photoshop training.

Our authors are all hard-working professionals, but occasionally, they get to let their hair down at a nice dinner with their lynda-peeps, or let off some steam with a fun Friday lunch playing on unicycles in the parking lot. Yes, there are actually quite a few unicyclers here at lynda.com!

Enjoy the pix, and as always, the training!

All the news that’s fit to design, edit, and print: Designing a Newsletter Hands-On Workshop

Published by | Monday, June 8th, 2009

In Designing a Newsletter Hands-On Workshop, graphic designer and Adobe Certified Instructor Nigel French uses Adobe InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop, and Bridge to create an eight-page newsletter that’s full of visual impact. Get his input on establishing an efficient workflow using multiple programs, examine the aesthetics of integrating text with images, and learn best practices for outputting a final document.