Posts Tagged ‘Monitor’

Why spot colors are necessary

Published by | Thursday, September 12th, 2013
Why spot colors are necessary

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Why do we need spot colors? It’s because humans can see a wide range of colors—some say 10 million shades—but there’s a limit to what we can print in CMYK, the industry-standard combination of cyan, magenta, yellow and black inks. This is where spot colors – absolute colors generated by a specific ink – come in to fill the gaps.

CMYK has its limits
The diagram below represents the range of colors humans can see. You’ll notice that what we can see on a monitor, and what the CMYK offset printing process is capable of reproducing, is less than what spot colors (the “PANTONE gamut” in the diagram below) can achieve. Bright oranges and navy blues can be especially challenging.

Use a field monitor for better shots: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, September 6th, 2013

DSLR Video Tips: Using peaking and focus in red

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A common phrase among DSLR pros is that “everything looks good on the back of the camera LCD.” While intended as a joke, the phrase really means that it’s hard to judge aspects of your shot like critical focus, color, and exposure using the LCD on the back of a DSLR camera. As these LCDs are generally very small, it can also be difficult for on-set clients and team members (like a focus puller) to clearly see what the camera is actually shooting.

That’s where field monitors come in. Over the past few years, lightweight field monitors offering flexible connectivity, high-resolution large screens, and extensive features have become more affordable. This week, we’ll explore the benefits of using a field monitor, including