Posts Tagged ‘Microsoft Excel’

Excel’s VLOOKUP and HLOOKUP functions explained

Published by | Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

Understanding HLOOKUP and VLOOKUP

Explore this course at lynda.com.


When looking up information in Microsoft Excel, you’ll regularly need to compare data against a table—and tables can be found in a variety of locations and formats. For example, in the image above you may need to find the appropriate tax rate in the table on the right for a given employee’s salary listed in the table on the left.

On the Formulas tab in the Excel ribbon, you’ll see a categories function called Look up and Reference. The two key functions for this type of task are VLOOKUP (V meaning vertical) and its companion function HLOOKUP (H meaning horizontal).

Why two functions instead of one? As shown in the image below, data tables can be found in horizontal and vertical orientations—so with two dedicated functions, you’re covered either way.

5 must-know Excel tips

Published by | Friday, January 10th, 2014

Boost your spreadsheet know-how in minutes with these easy Microsoft Excel tips from expert lynda.com instructors.

1. Learn how to keep the content of your cells within the boundaries of your design.

Watch more…

Office 2010 Beta Preview offers a taste of enhancements and new features

Published by | Monday, December 28th, 2009

In Office 2010 Beta Preview, David Rivers offers a taste of the enhancements and new features in Microsoft Office 2010. He explores the improved Ribbon, which is now customizable in each application in the suite. In Word, he discusses the expanded search function, in-document image editing, and the introduction of OpenType fonts.

David shows off the expanded filters and conditional formatting in Excel, and the ability to add screenshots and animation in PowerPoint. Access now includes the ability to create pre-built database modules, and David shows how to integrate and re-use these assets in an example database. Last but not least, he reviews the enhancements to Outlook and OneNote, which can link notes to all the applications in the suite. View the full course and let us know what you think.

lynda.com author (that Excel guy) Curt Frye teaches critical financial skills

Published by | Friday, November 20th, 2009

When Curt Frye started working with lynda.com, we were all very excited about the slew of new and much needed Microsoft Excel courses he was planning for us. With the state of the economy, and more people doing their own finances, as well as tightening their belts nearly to the point of of asphyxiation, it is becoming more critical for the general public to understand their finances, even on a very basic level.

In the November 2009 issue of the Harvard Business Review, The Forethought column “Teach Workers About the Perils of Debt.” states:

“It’s widely known that many consumers have poor numeracy–they can’t figure out percentages or do other elementary calculations–and have barely a rudimentary grasp of economics. In our research, we looked deeper, studying consumers’ ‘debt literacy,’ the ability to understand how interest rates work and make simple decisions about borrowing. We found it to be strikingly low.”

With the state of the economy, and more people doing their own finances, as well as tightening their belts nearly to the point of of asphyxiation, it is becoming more an more critical for the general public to understand their finances, even on a very basic level. <em>Photo courtesy of iStockphoto, image #3154423</em>

Curt's aim in creating a course on financial analysis was to teach skills required to analyze debt. Photo courtesy of iStockphoto, image #3154423

“My aim in creating Excel 2007: Financial Analysis was to teach the skills required to analyze debt,” said Curt Frye of his first lynda.com course. “I’m hoping that it helps subscribers better understand some critical skills that not everyone is taught at home or in school.”

Curt is currently working on a new book, as well as new lynda.com courses. For a full list of his training, visit his author page.