Posts Tagged ‘Lightroom’

Introducing Lightroom Mobile

Published by | Thursday, April 10th, 2014

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Lightroom Mobile is a new iPad app that might just change the way you work on your photos. When I first started using it as a beta-tester a few months ago, I was curious but not convinced. Truth be told, when it comes to new technology I’m a bit of a skeptic; apart from something being new, I want to know if it’s actually going to improve my life. Yet after a few weeks, my skepticism completely dissolved and I now consider Lightroom Mobile to be a game changer for photographers in the best possible way.

For the last seven years, working in Lightroom meant working on a traditional computer (desktop or laptop). But as the photographer’s toolkit expanded to include other devices like mobile phones and tablets, it seemed like Lightroom was missing the boat—that is, until now.

Lightroom Mobile isn’t just another make-your-photos-look-better app. Sure, it does that, but more importantly it extends your Lightroom Desktop workflow in a helpful way. Here’s how it works.

6 steps for creating dramatic skies in Lightroom

Published by | Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

Creating dramatic skies with Adobe Lightroom

A dramatic sky can make a photograph look great. Lightroom’s Graduated Filter tool offers a quick way to enhance a sky without affecting the rest of the photo.

1. Select the Graduated Filter tool in the tool strip in the Develop module, or press M on your keyboard. In the dropdown Graduated Filter panel, double click Effect to set all the controls to their defaults.

2. Drag the Exposure slider in the panel to the left. This step is optional, but it’s a good way to see where a graduated filter is going to affect your photo.

How to combine and modify presets in Lightroom

Published by | Monday, November 18th, 2013

Many photographers rely on Develop presets to quickly change the appearance of photos in Adobe Lightroom. You can extend the power of presets by modifying them to meet your current needs, or by combining presets on a photo.

Modifying presets
By modifying a preset, you can make a third-party preset your own or update one that you created yourself.

Modifying a preset in Lightroom

5 tips for touching up your photos in Lightroom

Published by | Wednesday, November 13th, 2013

You can quickly remove dust spots and unwanted content from your photos with Lightroom’s Spot Removal tool. These tips will help you make the most of the tool.

1. Get help visualizing spots

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When you’re viewing a photo on a small screen, you may not see all the tiny dust spots that can show up later in a print. Use the Spot Removal tool’s Visualize Spots option to locate subtle spots, like the dust on this window.

How to create presets in Lightroom

Published by | Tuesday, November 12th, 2013

Lightroom presets are a popular way to add great looks to your photos with just a few clicks. You can apply any of the presets that come with Lightroom or install third-party presets. When you’re feeling creative, make your own unique Develop presets by following these simple steps:

1. Adjust a representative photo

Faux HDR look preset

Open a photo into Lightroom’s Develop module, and adjust the image to the look you want using any of the controls in the panels on the right. For example, I’ve set the controls in the Basic panel to give this portrait a grungy faux HDR look.

5 tips for importing your photos into Adobe Lightroom

Published by | Monday, November 4th, 2013

1. Organizing before importing
Before you start importing photos into Lightroom, it’s a good idea to set up a folder structure for your photos outside of Lightroom. Make a top-level “Lightroom Photos” folder to hold all the photos you’ll eventually import. This top-level folder is important because it will make it easier to move all your photos to a larger drive if necessary in the future. Inside the top-level folder, organize your existing photos into subfolders by shoot date or subject matter. The subfolders will help you locate files in the Folders panel in Lightroom’s Library.

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After organizing your existing photos into a folder structure like this, you can import them all into Lightroom together. Each time you import new photos after a shoot, you’ll have a well-organized folder structure ready to receive them.

Fix exposure problems in a batch of photos: The Practicing Photographer

Published by | Thursday, September 12th, 2013
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Explore the Practicing Photographer at lynda.com.

In last week’s installment of The Practicing Photographer, we joined Ben Long at a wildlife preserve, where he photographed buffalo and prairie dogs—and shared some wildlife photography tips along the way.  This week, it’s back to the buffalo—but this time, they’re on Ben’s computer screen. Something went wrong during Ben’s wildlife shoot: A lot of his photos were slightly overexposed and washed out. Camera light meters aren’t perfect, and when they don’t read a scene accurately, exposure problems result.

Fortunately, Adobe Photoshop—and other imaging programs, such as Lightroom, Aperture, and iPhoto—can often fix exposure problems. And if you shoot using your camera’s raw mode, you have that much more adjustment flexibility. That’s because raw mode saves every bit of data that your camera’s sensor recorded. By comparison, when you shoot in JPEG mode, your camera’s internal software—in its zeal to create a compact image file—throws away roughly one-third of the information that the sensor recorded.

This week’s Featured Five: Using efficient, organized communication

Published by | Monday, April 16th, 2012

For this week’s Featured Five post, I’ve chosen five free movies from our library that emphasize efficient, organized, collaborative communication. Sometimes this means formatting your work so that people can find and use it easily, sometimes it means presenting your data in a visually organized way so that people can immediately comprehend it, and other times it means effectively using the features of your software application that are designed to help you track important collaborative notes. At the heart of it, it’s always about communicating in an organized way to make your work more efficient and your projects more successful.

1. Communicating effectively and efficiently with colleagues

Good organized communication is critical for collaboration. In this movie from chapter four of Effective MeetingsDave Crenshaw discusses the importance of the one-to-one meeting, and why establishing one-to-one meetings can not only increase effectiveness, but efficiency as well:

2. Choosing your favorite images to share from a photo shoot

Lightroom is a great program for developing your digital photographs, but it also has a lot of pure organizational power that you can use to find just the right image you (or someone else) are looking for. In this movie from his new course Photoshop Lightroom 4 Essentials: Organizing and Sharing with the Library Module, Chris Orwig shows you how to use Lightroom’s built-in ability to quickly tag photos with picks, rejects, star-ratings, and colored flag labels. Then, once you have using notations and labels down, you can use your tags to quickly find the photos you want to share:

3. Sharing complicated information visually

Sometimes complicated information is best initially understood and communicated with graphics. In this movie from chapter one of Infographics: Visualizing Relationships, Shane Snow walks you through the infographic creative process and demonstrates setup on an infographic example that contains 24 entities, or ‘characters’ as he calls them:

4. Documenting your audio post-production session in Pro Tools

Creating a film or video with a lot of moving parts takes clear, documented communication. In this movie from chapter three of Audio for Film and Video with Pro Tools, Scott Hirsch takes you though the preparation and documentation process that makes a meeting between the film’s director, producer, music composer, and other creative forces effective. This meeting is called a spotting session, because its purpose is to spot exact points in the video where sound ideas can develop:

5. Making your web site accessible to improve human and computer communication

One main reason to have a web site is to communicate efficiently with others—and with web technology, that means being able to communicate across a multitude of platforms and interfaces in a language that is clear and easy for humans to understand. In this movie from chapter one of Improving SEO Using Accessibility Techniques, Morton Rand-Hendrickson demonstrates the communication benefits of implementing strong web site accessibility practices that will improve your SEO, and your human-to-human communication:

 

What other things have you learned on lynda.com about getting files, people, or entire groups organized? Are there any areas you’d like to see us explore in more depth?

Are you feeling inspired to explore more content? Remember, 10 percent of all lynda.com content is free to try. Just click on any of the blue links on any course table of contents page in our library.

Free Movies

 

See you back next week with five more free selections!

 

Suggested courses to watch next:
Effective Meetings
Improving SEO Using Accessibility Techniques
Audio for Film and Video with Pro Tools
Infographics: Visualizing Relationships
Photoshop Lightroom 4 Essentials: Organizing and Sharing with the Library Module