Posts Tagged ‘James Fritz’

Create a canvas texture in Photoshop

Published by | Friday, April 4th, 2014

Create a canvas texture in Photoshop

This week, Bert Monroy wraps up a tutorial series on his digital painting Oyster Bar by showing us how to create a canvas texture from scratch in Photoshop.

Create a manhole cover with Illustrator and Photoshop: Pixel Playground

Published by | Friday, March 28th, 2014

Create a manhole cover with Illustrator and Photoshop

This week Bert shows us how to create the realistic manhole cover in his digital painting Oyster Bar—all from scratch using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop.

Creating water ripples in Photoshop: Pixel Playground

Published by | Friday, March 14th, 2014

Creating water ripples in Photoshop

For the next few weeks, Bert is going to take time to share some of the techniques used to great effect in his digital painting Oyster Bar. This week he offers some tips on creating water ripples in Photoshop.

Create bolts in Photoshop: Pixel Playground

Published by | Friday, February 28th, 2014

Create bolts in Photoshop

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This week, Bert continues to explore the digital techniques that went into his painting “Damen.” Today’s tutorial focuses on how to create bolts and rivets from scratch in Adobe Photoshop.

Create a train car in Photoshop: Pixel Playground

Published by | Friday, February 21st, 2014

Creating a train in Photoshop

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This week Bert begins digging into the making of his digital painting “Damen,” which will be his focus for the next few episodes of Pixel Playground. Today’s tutorial shows how he created multiple train cars for the painting.

Bert deconstructs how he built the face of the train from a series of Photoshop layers. Next he takes a complete train and scales it into the proper perspective with a slight tilt to add a sense of movement on the tracks. And he wraps this week’s tutorial up by showing how to repeat this technique a few more times and create an even longer train.

Creating a wood floor in Photoshop: Pixel Playground

Published by | Friday, February 14th, 2014

Create a wood floor in Photoshop

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Bert wraps up his three-part magazine cover project this week by teaching us how he created a realistic wood floor in Photoshop for his cinema setting. He begins the process by running a series of Adobe Photoshop filters to create a textured effect that will eventually become wood grain in his floor. Next he uses the Liquefy filter to distort the texture into more organic shapes that represent the natural pattern of growth rings inside wood. He finishes the technique by individually coloring and moving around pieces of the newly created “wood” texture to create a realistic, interlocking wood floor.

Creating a lamp: Pixel Playground

Published by | Friday, February 7th, 2014

Creating a lamp in Photoshop

Bert continues his magazine-cover tutorial series this week by focusing on how he created a softly lit lamp within the scene using Illustrator and Photoshop.

He begins in Adobe llustrator, creating a vector outline for the lamp. Once the basic outline has been completed, he pastes the resulting paths into Photoshop to add depth, relief, and texture to the lamp. After adding some layer effects to flesh out the base, he finishes by adding a texture to the shade, and a glowing light underneath it for a final touch of realism.

Using perspective to draw in Illustrator: Pixel Playground

Published by | Friday, January 31st, 2014

Using perspective to draw in Illustrator

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This week Bert kicks off a short series of tutorials showing how he created an illustrated magazine cover. Today’s technique is all about how to create a two-point perspective system in Adobe Illustrator so you can draw your artwork.

Bert begins by finding the left edge vanishing point based on a few elements of the artwork on his page. With the first vanishing point established, he can then determine a horizon line and eventually create a second point of perspective. Bert finishes up the lesson by showing how he used these lines to create his final illustration.