Posts Tagged ‘iPhoto’

Fix exposure problems in a batch of photos: The Practicing Photographer

Published by | Thursday, September 12th, 2013
ben

Explore the Practicing Photographer at lynda.com.

In last week’s installment of The Practicing Photographer, we joined Ben Long at a wildlife preserve, where he photographed buffalo and prairie dogs—and shared some wildlife photography tips along the way.  This week, it’s back to the buffalo—but this time, they’re on Ben’s computer screen. Something went wrong during Ben’s wildlife shoot: A lot of his photos were slightly overexposed and washed out. Camera light meters aren’t perfect, and when they don’t read a scene accurately, exposure problems result.

Fortunately, Adobe Photoshop—and other imaging programs, such as Lightroom, Aperture, and iPhoto—can often fix exposure problems. And if you shoot using your camera’s raw mode, you have that much more adjustment flexibility. That’s because raw mode saves every bit of data that your camera’s sensor recorded. By comparison, when you shoot in JPEG mode, your camera’s internal software—in its zeal to create a compact image file—throws away roughly one-third of the information that the sensor recorded.

Get an audio clip onto YouTube using iPhoto: Monday Productivity Pointers

Published by | Monday, July 15th, 2013

This week in Monday Productivity Pointers, I’ll answer a question I get asked frequently: What’s an easy way to get an audio file (like a sound clip or MP3 file of a song) posted online so you can easily share it on social media sites like Facebook or Twitter?

In my first video, I’ll show you a neat trick to get your audio clips onto YouTube, which is a fantastic springboard from which to share your media files. What makes it particularly easy is you can share it out to many social networks directly from YouTube.

To do it, you’ll need a Mac with the built-in iPhoto app installed on it, an active YouTube account (which you already have, if you have a Google account), the iTunes application, your sound clip, and some photos. Finally, your sound clip has to be free of any DRM restrictions—that is, you can’t use a copyrighted song.

 

iPhoto and Photoshop integration: Editing iPhoto images with Adobe Camera Raw

Published by | Friday, May 18th, 2012

After watching our popular Photoshop CS5 Essential Training course, and hearing all about the photo-developing power of Adobe Camera Raw, one of our members wanted to know how to open her JPEG files in Adobe Camera Raw directly from within iPhoto. With a few Preference-setting hoops to jump through, it is entirely possible to set up iPhoto and Photoshop so that you can use iPhoto as your Photo organizing database of choice and still use Camera Raw in Photoshop to edit your JPEGs. Here’s a quick video tutorial that shows you the path of least resistance:

Note that for quick one-way edits (meaning you don’t have any need to go back to iPhoto with your newly edited image), you can set the Photoshop preferences as shown in the video, then simply drag an image from your iPhoto preview window onto the Photoshop icon in your dock  and the image will open in Adobe Camera Raw (ACR). Also note, while I recorded this in Photoshop CS5, the preference settings are identical in Photoshop CS6. As a bonus, if you’re already using Photoshop CS6, expect to see some improvements to ACR developing, too.

Please keep the feedback and the thoughtful questions coming, we appreciate it. Do you have any follow-up questions you’ve noted after completing a lynda.com course? We’d love to hear them!

 

Interested in more?
• All Design courses on lynda.com
• All Photoshop courses on lynda.com

Suggested courses to watch next:
Photoshop CS6 Essential Training
Photoshop CS5 Essential Training
Photoshop and Bridge CS5 for Photographers New Features
Photoshop CS6 for Photographers: Camera Raw 7

10 things you should know about iPhoto, InDesign, Bridge, and more

Published by | Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009

For those of you looking to brush up on a few skills but are limited on time, lynda.com has developed a new “10 Things” series. This series is a great way to get the highlights of a software application before deciding to dive into the full-length training course. We’ve been really excited about these new “10 Things” courses and hope you enjoy them as well! Here are some of the current 10 Things courses with more on the way. Let us know what you think!

Things iPhoto thinks are faces

Published by | Tuesday, May 26th, 2009

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My favorite new feature of iPhoto ’09 is Faces–a combination of face detection and face recognition technology that lets you sort and organize your iPhoto collection by the people who appear in your pictures. Faces also provides behind the scenes improvements in activities like slideshows, making sure your subjects’ faces stay onscreen if you’re using effects that incorporate zooming and panning. If you’ve used previous versions of iPhoto and have been frustrated when your slideshows zoom in on people’s feet instead of their faces, you know what I’m talking about.

Using Faces is a simple matter of letting iPhoto detect the people in your pictures and typing in their names. iPhoto then goes through the rest of your library, finding other pictures of those people and tagging names to them. And for the most part, it does this incredibly well. You do have to coach iPhoto by letting it know when it’s put the correct or incorrect name to people, but in my testing and real-world use, iPhoto has surprised me with its accuracy. It can tell the difference between twins, and recognize people wearing sunglasses or with other parts of their faces partially obscured.

But if you’ve been using Faces, you also know there are times when iPhoto sees faces that aren’t really there, and those instances can range from making you scratch your head in wonderment at iPhoto’s tendency to find faces in hubcaps and rock formations, or laugh out loud when iPhoto sees a face in a ball of cookie dough or offers a photo of a baseball as a match to one of your friend’s faces.

I was so amused by these quirks in Faces, that I started a flickr group called “Things iPhoto Thinks Are Faces.” I thought it would be a fun way for my friends to share the times when Faces misfires, but it seems to have struck a nerve among iPhoto users and the group now has hundreds of members and submissions. You can check it out here:http://www.flickr.com/groups/977532@N24/

When iPhoto finds faces where none exist, I see it as a reflection of how we as humans are pattern seekers–seeing faces and formations where none may have been intended. As you check out the photos in the gallery, you might be surprised at how many of iPhoto’s finds actually look like faces if you squint or stare at them for a while. In much the same manner as we look to other applications to speed up our work by performing repetitive tasks faster than we’re able to do on our own, iPhoto has become an efficient pattern finder–locating things that look like faces that we might not have noticed on our own.

If you’re a Mac user and haven’t checked out Faces in iPhoto ’09 yet, be sure to give it a spin. It’s surprisingly addictive to go through your library tagging names to faces. And be sure to check out Derrick Story’s “10 Things to Know about iPhoto: Faces” to learn more about how to take advantage of this awesome feature of iPhoto.

-Garrick Chow