Posts Tagged ‘Deke’s Techniques’

Deleting photobombers with Photoshop: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, February 25th, 2014

Delete photobombers with Photoshop

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You’ve got a great location, a great group of friends, a great camera. All the makings of a great shot, right? But you get the file off the camera and onto your computer and lo and behold: a photobomber appears. Some person detracting from the main event, intentionally or not. Happily, with the tools in Adobe Photoshop, you can remove unwanted guests or any other undesired elements from your photographs. You don’t even need the latest version of Photoshop. In fact, in this week’s episode of Deke’s Techniques, Deke takes you through the old-school method for removing a photobomber from an otherwise fantastic photo. These are results you’re not going to get with Content-Aware Fill, the Patch tool, or even the brand-new Content-Aware Move tool. No, you have to go back to the basics. We’re talking Photoshop version 3, circa 1994 basics. Watch today’s free video to learn how.

Mastering exposure in Camera Raw: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, February 18th, 2014
Mastering exposure in Camera Raw

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.

Pop quiz: What exactly does the Exposure slider do in Adobe Camera Raw? Chances are some of you will say it controls highlight, some will claim it affects the midtones, and some will just throw up your hands. Deke McClelland is here to clear up any confusion you may have around this adjustment and help you master exposure in Camera Raw.

Today in Deke’s Techniques, he’ll help you take a dark, heavily shadowed image and bring out the brightness—and rugged handsomeness—of its subject: fellow lynda.com author James Williamson! (Did you know these guys hang out together? Worlds collide!) He’ll accomplish all of this using the controls in the Basic tab in Camera Raw, including the Exposure slider. He’ll also show how to avoid clipping your shadows and highlights, work directly in the histogram, and make other adjustments in the Effects tab to diminish any noise that might occur as the result of your exposure adjustment.

Enlarge a low-res photograph in Photoshop: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

Upsample an image in Photoshop

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Welcome back to Deke’s Techniques! Today’s episode takes you on a trip in the “not-so-way-back machine” as we revisit an Adobe Photoshop technique from January. Deke will show you how to upsample another teeny tiny image, but this time it’s a flat file—no layers at all—and he’ll show you how to perform the resampling in CS6 and earlier versions of Photoshop. This technique shows how you can get great results even from images without a lot of data.

Watch the free video below as Deke takes a 578×750 pixel, .5 MB file and transforms it into a 1,400 percent larger version of itself with Photoshop CS6. He also shows how to mimic the results you get from the Creative Cloud upsampling algorithm with an application of Unsharp Mask.

Painting happy little trees: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, February 4th, 2014
Painting happy little trees

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.

As Deke notes, one of the most obscure features in Adobe Photoshop CC, the 14.2 update specifically, is its ability to automatically generate trees. But it’s actually quite cool. You can make trees of all shapes, sizes, colors, and species. In this episode of Deke’s Techniques, Deke McClelland shows how to fill a basic background with “happy little trees” with the new Tree pattern.

Along the way, he’ll share a shortcut to this fabulous feature (accessible through the Fill dialog) and show how to adjust all the controls inside the Tree dialog box. He dials in a custom foliage color, rearranges the limbs, randomizes a tree’s appearance, and scales the trees individually within the artwork.

Upsampling a composition: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

Upsampling a composition

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Upsampling is one of the most misunderstood topics in Adobe Photoshop. When you increase your image size without upsampling, you’re not increasing the number of pixels in that image; you’re simply spreading them over a larger area. As a result, you can end up with a pixelated, low-resolution image. But when you upsample your image, Photoshop interpolates or makes up extra pixels based on the information in the surrounding pixels. It’s not magic, not a special formula. But your mileage may vary. Photoshop treats different types of layers (backgrounds, text, Smart Objects, etc.) differently when you scale. Knowing how the layers in your image will react to upsampling can help you make adjustments beforehand that will result in a better final image. In this episode of Deke’s Techniques, Deke explains exactly how different layers react to resizing, and then shows you how to use the Median and Gaussian Blur filters to smooth out problem areas in an image before you resize it.

Exporting an illustration as a universally supported PNG file: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, January 21st, 2014

Exporting a PNG avatar from Illustrator

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Welcome to the final stage in the Deke’s Techniques avatar challenge—where you transform your Adobe Illustrator file into a PNG graphic with a transparent background. Transparent PNGs are now supported by all major web browsers, so it’s a great file format choice for graphics you intend to display on the web. The trick to this technique is to take your file back to Photoshop. From there, you can compare it to your reference photograph for accuracy and make sure the avatar scales down correctly. Deke also shows you how to nicely center your avatar on the canvas, and choose the resampling option that’s best for reducing the size of your artwork—and (surprise) it’s not the option Adobe recommends. Learn all about it in today’s free video.

Embellishing an avatar in Illustrator: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, January 14th, 2014

Embellishing an avatar in Illustrator

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Welcome back to Deke’s Techniques and the second step to building your own avatar. Last week you learned how to use Adobe Photoshop’s Pen tool to trace your photograph. This week Deke shows you how to copy your path outlines, paste them into Illustrator, and enhance your drawing there. You’ll learn how to add hand-drawn embellishments (like flowing locks and wide eyes) and align your tracing with your hand-drawn paths. The result: A striking black-and-white avatar that will delight your friends on Facebook and your followers on Twitter.

Tracing a social avatar in Photoshop: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, January 7th, 2014

Tracing a social avatar with the Photoshop Pen tool.

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.


Embark on the first part of a three-week journey that will lead to your own unique social avatar—a perfect profile pic to represent yourself in the online world. Simply provide your own photograph and follow along with Deke. This episode of Deke’s Techniques shows how to use the Pen tool in Adobe Photoshop to carefully trace your features and edit the anchor points along the way. In the end you’ll have a series of path outlines, which, handily, can later be imported into Illustrator for further refinement.

Watch the free video below to get started and come back next week to learn how to start fleshing out your social avatar in Illustrator.