Posts Tagged ‘Deke McClelland’

Enlarge a low-res photograph in Photoshop: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

Upsample an image in Photoshop

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.


Welcome back to Deke’s Techniques! Today’s episode takes you on a trip in the “not-so-way-back machine” as we revisit an Adobe Photoshop technique from January. Deke will show you how to upsample another teeny tiny image, but this time it’s a flat file—no layers at all—and he’ll show you how to perform the resampling in CS6 and earlier versions of Photoshop. This technique shows how you can get great results even from images without a lot of data.

Watch the free video below as Deke takes a 578×750 pixel, .5 MB file and transforms it into a 1,400 percent larger version of itself with Photoshop CS6. He also shows how to mimic the results you get from the Creative Cloud upsampling algorithm with an application of Unsharp Mask.

Painting happy little trees: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, February 4th, 2014
Painting happy little trees

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.

As Deke notes, one of the most obscure features in Adobe Photoshop CC, the 14.2 update specifically, is its ability to automatically generate trees. But it’s actually quite cool. You can make trees of all shapes, sizes, colors, and species. In this episode of Deke’s Techniques, Deke McClelland shows how to fill a basic background with “happy little trees” with the new Tree pattern.

Along the way, he’ll share a shortcut to this fabulous feature (accessible through the Fill dialog) and show how to adjust all the controls inside the Tree dialog box. He dials in a custom foliage color, rearranges the limbs, randomizes a tree’s appearance, and scales the trees individually within the artwork.

Upsampling a composition: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

Upsampling a composition

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.


Upsampling is one of the most misunderstood topics in Adobe Photoshop. When you increase your image size without upsampling, you’re not increasing the number of pixels in that image; you’re simply spreading them over a larger area. As a result, you can end up with a pixelated, low-resolution image. But when you upsample your image, Photoshop interpolates or makes up extra pixels based on the information in the surrounding pixels. It’s not magic, not a special formula. But your mileage may vary. Photoshop treats different types of layers (backgrounds, text, Smart Objects, etc.) differently when you scale. Knowing how the layers in your image will react to upsampling can help you make adjustments beforehand that will result in a better final image. In this episode of Deke’s Techniques, Deke explains exactly how different layers react to resizing, and then shows you how to use the Median and Gaussian Blur filters to smooth out problem areas in an image before you resize it.

Embellishing an avatar in Illustrator: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, January 14th, 2014

Embellishing an avatar in Illustrator

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.


Welcome back to Deke’s Techniques and the second step to building your own avatar. Last week you learned how to use Adobe Photoshop’s Pen tool to trace your photograph. This week Deke shows you how to copy your path outlines, paste them into Illustrator, and enhance your drawing there. You’ll learn how to add hand-drawn embellishments (like flowing locks and wide eyes) and align your tracing with your hand-drawn paths. The result: A striking black-and-white avatar that will delight your friends on Facebook and your followers on Twitter.

Tracing a social avatar in Photoshop: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, January 7th, 2014

Tracing a social avatar with the Photoshop Pen tool.

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.


Embark on the first part of a three-week journey that will lead to your own unique social avatar—a perfect profile pic to represent yourself in the online world. Simply provide your own photograph and follow along with Deke. This episode of Deke’s Techniques shows how to use the Pen tool in Adobe Photoshop to carefully trace your features and edit the anchor points along the way. In the end you’ll have a series of path outlines, which, handily, can later be imported into Illustrator for further refinement.

Watch the free video below to get started and come back next week to learn how to start fleshing out your social avatar in Illustrator.

Dynamic Effects in Adobe Illustrator: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Friday, January 3rd, 2014
Deke's Techniques on lynda.com

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.

Happy New Year! The parties may be over, but it’s not too late to celebrate the arrival of 2014 with another brand-new Adobe Illustrator tutorial from Deke McClelland and lynda.com. This episode of Deke’s Techniques transforms four simple path outlines into a cheerful and ornamental New Year’s design—without any drawing. Deke never picks up the Pen tool. How does he do it? This technique uses dynamic effects in Adobe Illustrator- in particular a combination of the Transform and Zig Zag effects, a seamlessly repeating tile pattern, and an opacity mask. Watch the free video below to get started.

Developing a 32-bit HDR image in Camera Raw: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

Develop a 32-bit HDR Image in Camera Raw

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.


Today’s Deke’s Techniques video shows how to merge multiple exposures inside of Adobe Photoshop CC and Camera Raw, creating a high dynamic range (HDR) image. For those not in the know, HDR imaging reproduces a wider exposure range, capturing both the faintest and most direct light in a single image. The classic example is a dark ground plane against a bright sky. However, without a special HDR-equipped camera, you don’t have much of a choice when you’re shooting. You can capture the sky and let the foreground recede into shadow, or capture the foreground and blow out the sky. By combining these images in post, you get the best of both worlds: a bright sky with detailed shadows.

In this technique, Deke uses Photoshop to perform the Merge to HDR Pro, resulting in a 32-bit image with lots of visual information but not a lot of life. He then takes advantage of the seamless Creative Cloud workflow to send the 32-bit HDR image to Camera Raw for further refinement, using the Camera Raw filter. Get started with the free video below, which includes bonus tips on getting multiple exposures with your camera’s bracketed shooting mode.

Painting an eye with Photoshop: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, December 10th, 2013

Paint an eye using a custom brush

Explore Deke’s Techniques at lynda.com.


Howdy, Deke geeks! Are you staying warm? Because it’s minus 2 degrees in Boulder, Colorado, home base of Deke’s Techniques. But neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night keeps Deke from the swift completion of his appointed rounds. This week, he’ll show you how to use a custom Adobe Photoshop brush to paint an eye from scratch. This technique teaches you so much. Learn how to align two layers while keeping one layer stationary. Adjust roundness and angle of a brush. Paint with dynamic layer effects, lock the transparency of a layer, and select, scale, and rotate a custom brush—all in order to produce the final “eye-catching” effect: a beautiful flecked iris.