Posts Tagged ‘Apple’

Playing the Smart Strings in GarageBand for iPad

Published by | Friday, September 28th, 2012

You may find the Apple iPad touchscreen useful for many things in your everyday life, but did you know that you could use it to play violin, viola, cello, and upright bass? Even if you use a different Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) for your music production, you might want to consider using Smart Strings in GarageBand for iPad if adding a string part to your songs is something that interests you.

In iPad Music Production: GarageBand, Garrick Chow shows how to play the Smart Strings, including how to play in chord mode and note mode. In chord mode, the chords are made by up to five instruments: 1st violin, 2nd violin, viola, cello, and bass, or any combination of the five. Choose the key of the song and eight chord strips appear, one for every chord in that key.

Apple now permits third party development tools for iPhone and iPad

Published by | Friday, September 10th, 2010

In a press release dated September 9, 2010, Apple Inc. announced that they are lifting restrictions they’d put in place earlier this year on which tools developers could use to create iOS apps for distribution in the Apple App Store.

A bit of background: Earlier this year, Apple changed the license for members of the iOS Developers Program (then known as the iPhone Developers Program), restricting developers from using anything other than Apple’s Xcode development tools and a small set of languages that included Objective-C and C++. This had an immediate impact on Adobe Systems and its Flash developer community; Adobe had created the Packager for iPhone, which supports compilation of Flash presentations into native iOS apps. Adobe Flash Professional CS5 was released with the feature intact, but it was suddenly clear that Flash developers who created iOS apps with this workflow would not have their applications accepted by Apple for distribution in their App Store.

That’s now changed. Developers using Flash and other tools for iOS app development (such as Novell’s Monotouch, Appcelerator’s Titanium, and the open source Phonegap) are now assured that their apps will be considered for inclusion in the App Store on an equal basis with apps built with Xcode and Objective-C. The developer licensing agreement, which previously set the restrictions on tools and languages, now simply says:

3.3.2 An Application may not download or install executable code.  Interpreted code may only be used in an Application if all scripts, code and interpreters are packaged in the Application and not downloaded. The only exception to the foregoing is scripts and code downloaded and run by Apple’s built-in WebKit framework.

This means that Adobe Flash Player still won’t appear on the iPhone and iPad, since it requires downloading executable code at runtime. That’s a separate issue that isn’t addressed by this licensing change. But applications that are compiled prior to posting in the App Store can now be built with the language and development tool of your choice. And we believe that choice is good!

In response, we’re revisiting our plans for offering training on using Flash Professional CS5 to create apps for iOS devices (iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch). Content we’d already created for Flash Professional CS5 Essential Training, but didn’t include in the course’s initial release due to Apple’s licensing restrictions, will be added back into the course within a few days (check back frequently if you’re an Online Training Library® member). And if we hear from you, our members, that you want training in other development tools for iOS such as Monotouch, Titanium and Phonegap, we’ll seek out the best industry experts to create new courses.

Scott Hirsch discusses his new lynda.com title: Logic Pro 9 Essential Training

Published by | Friday, March 12th, 2010

I first got to know Scott a number of months back when he and I started to work out the details of the Logic Pro 9 Essential Training course. Up until the time that he came out to our studios, we had never met in person. Phone, instant message, and email was it.

During this time, it quickly became apparent that Scott was not new to training. In fact, he’s been teaching on audio/DAW subjects for 10 years now. He’s extremely adept at conveying the essentials as well as putting them into practical applications.

I’m happy to announce that the Logic Pro 9 Essential Training course that Scott was recording in February is now live.

Snow Leopard favorite new feature: Effortless scanner/printer installs

Published by | Monday, September 21st, 2009

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When Apple first announced at their 2008 World Wide Developers Conference that the new version of OS X would be called Snow Leopard, they included the surprising statement that Snow Leopard would have “zero new features.” Now of course, this was a bit of an exaggeration—there are enough new features to warrant my recording Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard New Features (available now!), but the point was that Snow Leopard’s main focus was under the hood, with the goal of making OS X faster, more efficient, and less bulky. Hence the the name Snow Leopard, which references the similarities of the new OS to the previous OS, Leopard.

Although the cosmetic changes are few, Snow Leopard features several enhancements to the Finder, the Dock, and to most of the built-in applications like QuickTime, iChat, Mail, and so on, but my favorite new feature so far is Snow Leopard’s greatly improved support for scanners connected directly to your Mac or on your local network.

Prior to Snow Leopard, I was locked in a never-ending battle with my moody and unpredictable network printer/scanner, which never seemed to be able to communicate consistently with my Mac. Some days it would work, some days it wouldn’t (I won’t name the brand, but let’s just say it rhymes with Pewlett Hackard). I was constantly updating and reinstalling drivers, restarting both the scanner and my Mac, and it would still only function properly occasionally.

But once I installed Snow Leopard, I was able to leave all the third-party software and drivers behind. Using Preview, which comes as part of OS X, I chose File > Import from Scanner and instantly my Mac found my scanner, installed drivers, and opened the scanning interface, from which I could select my scanning options and preferences. It just worked, and I’ve since tried it with my scanner in my home office as well with identical results. That alone was worth the $30 upgrade price to me.

And even if you don’t use scanners much these days, you’ll be happy to know that setting up a printer in Snow Leopard is just as easy. Again, you no longer have to manually install any drivers. As long as you have an internet connection, choosing File > Print will cause OS X to find your your printer and automatically install the proper drivers from the collection of pre-installed drivers included with the OS, or failing that, it will find the necessary software on the internet, download it, and install it. There’s nothing else you need to do. Of course, I haven’t personally tested every scanner/printer out there, but I’ve already experienced the ease and advantage of this feature several times when I’ve found myself in someone else’s office connected to a printer I hadn’t previously installed on my MacBook.

So if you’ve been considering upgrading to Snow Leopard and you rely on multiple scanners and printers as much as I do, I definitely recommend you make the switch. And be sure to check out my Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard New Features course in the Online Training Library®. I go into much more detail demonstrating how Snow Leopard recognizes and installs scanners and printers, and I cover lots more of what you’ll find in the latest version of Mac OS X.

Exclusive online tutorials on Final Cut Studio at lynda.com

Published by | Thursday, July 23rd, 2009

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We are pleased to announce Final Cut Studio Overview, with nearly three hours of free video training content for Apple’s latest release of Final Cut Studio. Produced and recorded by Damian Allen, these video tutorials will introduce you to new features and have you up to speed in no time. Check out new content on Final Cut Pro 7, Motion 4, Color 1.5, Soundtrack Pro 3, DVD Studio Pro 4, Compressor 3.5, and Final Cut Server 1.5: http://www.lynda.com/finalcutstudio/