Photography - Post archive

How to create presets in Lightroom

Published by | Tuesday, November 12th, 2013

Lightroom presets are a popular way to add great looks to your photos with just a few clicks. You can apply any of the presets that come with Lightroom or install third-party presets. When you’re feeling creative, make your own unique Develop presets by following these simple steps:

1. Adjust a representative photo

Faux HDR look preset

Open a photo into Lightroom’s Develop module, and adjust the image to the look you want using any of the controls in the panels on the right. For example, I’ve set the controls in the Basic panel to give this portrait a grungy faux HDR look.

Should you bother using a lens shade? The Practicing Photographer

Published by | Thursday, November 7th, 2013

Ben Long demonstrates a lens shade

Explore The Practicing Photographer at lynda.com.


The lowly lens shade might just be the least glamorous piece of gear in your camera bag. It’s that plastic ring that attaches to your lens and helps guard against flare—those bright circles that appear when your camera is pointed near the sun or another bright light source.

Most new lenses include shades. So why does Ben Long confess to rarely using them—indeed, to having a “completely irrational fear” of the things? That’s the subject of this week’s installment of The Practicing Photographer.

5 tips for importing your photos into Adobe Lightroom

Published by | Monday, November 4th, 2013

1. Organizing before importing
Before you start importing photos into Lightroom, it’s a good idea to set up a folder structure for your photos outside of Lightroom. Make a top-level “Lightroom Photos” folder to hold all the photos you’ll eventually import. This top-level folder is important because it will make it easier to move all your photos to a larger drive if necessary in the future. Inside the top-level folder, organize your existing photos into subfolders by shoot date or subject matter. The subfolders will help you locate files in the Folders panel in Lightroom’s Library.

kabili_post1_screenshot1

After organizing your existing photos into a folder structure like this, you can import them all into Lightroom together. Each time you import new photos after a shoot, you’ll have a well-organized folder structure ready to receive them.

Elevate your camera: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, November 1st, 2013

Using a jib to elevate your camera

Explore DSLR Video Tips at lynda.com.


A great way to create more interesting video perspectives is to raise your camera higher. Positioning the camera above any scene gives a unique view—and putting the camera into motion from that position can result in really dynamic shots.

In this week’s video, we look at a couple of tools for raising your camera up higher, and discuss techniques for getting the most out of elevated shots.

Advice for wildlife photo safaris: The Practicing Photographer

Published by | Thursday, October 24th, 2013

safari photo

Explore The Practicing Photographer at lynda.com.


This week on The Practicing Photographer, Ben Long goes where the buffalo roam: to a wildlife reserve in Oklahoma, where he encounters a herd of American buffalo. It isn’t exactly a wildlife safari, but it is a good chance for Ben to talk about the opportunities and limitations of an actual big-game photo safari in an exotic location.

Wildlife photo safaris are hugely popular in locations ranging from Alaska to Kenya to Antarctica. They’re a great way to see exotic critters in their natural habitats. And if you go on a guided safari, you’ll have someone along who’s adept at spotting interesting animals and can share insights on their behavior.

Mastering shutter speed: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, October 11th, 2013

Master your shutter speed

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Does your footage look too choppy? Are action scenes a streaky mess? It might be because your shutter speed isn’t set properly. The shutter in a camera is a lot like a pair of shutters on a window. It controls how much light comes through and hits the camera’s sensor.

This week, we continue to look at exposure. There are three critical pieces to achieving good exposure and creative control with your shots. Fortunately, shutter speed is the easiest to learn, with just a few simple rules.

Mastering aperture: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, October 4th, 2013

Mastering the Aperture

Explore DSLR Video Tips at lynda.com.


How much light does your camera see? The aperture of your camera is its portal to the light in your scene (and without light, there are no pictures or video). Controlling the aperture is essential to getting the right amount of light on to your camera’s sensor to capture the best shots.

There’s another side to aperture as well. As you open the aperture wider, you can narrow the depth of field in your shot, blurring more of the frame outside of your immediate focus area. This is often a hallmark of the “DSLR video” look. Mastering aperture is critical to high-quality video and photos.

In search of photo opportunities: The Practicing Photographer

Published by | Thursday, September 26th, 2013

Ben Long on the road

Explore The Practicing Photographer at lynda.com.


Any time of year is a good time of year for a road trip, especially one without a specific destination. Pack some camera gear, get in the car, and keep your eyes open.

That’s what Ben Long did in this week’s installment of The Practicing Photographer, and he struck gold—or, more accurately, black and white. As he and a lynda.com crew drove down a two-lane road in rural Oklahoma, Ben noticed a small stand of fire-damaged trees whose trunks had dramatic patterns of black and white.

Time to pull over and remove the lens cap.