Design - Post archive

Create a canvas texture in Photoshop

Published by | Friday, April 4th, 2014

Create a canvas texture in Photoshop

This week, Bert Monroy wraps up a tutorial series on his digital painting Oyster Bar by showing us how to create a canvas texture from scratch in Photoshop.

Top one ways to be more creative

Published by | Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

Top one ways to be more creative

We all strive to be more creative. How many times have we admired a cool campaign, an ingenious product design, a spectacular photograph, a smart logo, or an awesome video clip—and wished we could have come up with those ideas?

So how do we grow in our creativity? The first step is expanding our vision and embracing more of what’s around us. Reading is one way to do that. In his course Drawing Vector Graphics, Von Glitschka equates reading to “thinking with someone else’s head.” And while it’s true that reading—and reading almost anything—will help you become more creative, it’s a slow, gradual process that requires investment over time. You can’t just read one thing and—BAM!—you’re a more creative person.

There is a quick fix however—a way to get an instant energy boost of creativity. And so I present my top one ways to be more creative.

Fitting text to a specific size

Published by | Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

Live Text Effects with InDesign

Ever see a great text treatment and wonder if it’s an image or actual live type? You too can fool the eye and create type that looks like a work of art—and then customize it to fit any frame.

Working with Photoshop 1.0: Deke’s Techniques

Published by | Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

Working with Photoshop 1.0

One of the goals of Deke’s Techniques is to keep you, our members, up to date with the latest technology. That’s why Deke is here today to introduce Adobe Photoshop, a new way to digitally manipulate scanned photographs. Right now it’s only available on Apple Macintoshes—still a niche product—but it’s worth exploring this clever little program if you can get your hands on a Mac IIci or even an IIfx model. Take a look at features like 2-megapixel image support, large and small brushes, one level of Undo per file, and partial support of color. Plus, there’s the brilliant Save As dialog box, which allows you to save your image as a PXR, or PICT Resource file. But only if you have enough memory.

3 Ways to Get Your Novel Ideas Approved (AUDIO)

Published by | Monday, March 31st, 2014

3 ways to get your novel ideas approved

What do we do when we present a great novel idea to our higher–ups and they don’t approve it? We often start generating less novel ideas—and that benefits no one. Listen to creativity expert Stefan Mumaw as he explains how to sell your novel ideas to stakeholders so they see their value, and put them into action.

Know what’s important to your audience and then sell it through that lens.

Digital matte painting is just good painting!

Published by | Friday, March 28th, 2014

Matte painting is just good painting!

Matte painting is meant to fool the viewer’s eye. It is a special effects technique that combines live-action footage with painted imagery that dates back to 1907— the very dawn of filmmaking. Mattes were originally painted on a sheet of glass, which was suspended in front of the camera. Today, with digital imaging, artists can work in Photoshop, and combine their paintings with a live-action plate in programs such as After Effects, Maya, or Nuke.

The tools and techniques I advocate aren’t just helpful for matte painting, but form the building blocks of all good paintings. If you want to learn the tools and techniques I use for creating a strong digital matte painting, here are five artistic principles to set you on the right path:

Create a manhole cover with Illustrator and Photoshop: Pixel Playground

Published by | Friday, March 28th, 2014

Create a manhole cover with Illustrator and Photoshop

This week Bert shows us how to create the realistic manhole cover in his digital painting Oyster Bar—all from scratch using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop.

Adding effects to reverse type: InDesign Secrets

Published by | Thursday, March 27th, 2014

InDesign Secrets

Do you want to make your headlines pop? Reverse type—light text against a dark background—is a good design choice. Readers are predisposed to seeing dark text on a light background, so the opposite effect is quite eye-catching. Although reverse type is a pretty standard design element at this point, you can make the effect fresh again with additional ornamentation. This week in InDesign Secrets, David Blatner shows how to use paragraph rules (both the Rule Above and Rule Below options) to add rounded caps, cutouts, and patterns to the backgrounds behind your type. He also shows how to build the rules into a paragraph style that you can reuse again and again throughout your documents.