Design - Post archive

Auto-Hiding Iconic Panels in Photoshop

Published by | Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

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Photoshop’s interface is highly customizable; you can rearrange panels, hide them, and pop panels in and out of your dock at will. Once you open a panel, though, it doesn’t automatically close after you’ve “done your business.” That can get annoying—fast. Luckily, Deke has a remedy for this minor irritation. In today’s free episode of Deke’s Techniques, he reveals the preference that enables you to collapse iconic panels quickly, by simply clicking anywhere else in Photoshop. (Iconic panels are the ones represented by icons in the secondary panel bar, like Properties, Brushes, etc.) Plus, get a bonus tip on moving around the fields in a panel straight from the keyboard.

A Brief Introduction to Font Management

Published by | Sunday, April 20th, 2014

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In this article, I’ll review some of the basic information about fonts and how to manage them for best results, with information from my course Font Management Essential Training.

Many of us think of fonts as simply the text-styling tools in our font menu—things like Helvetica Light, Cooper Black, Arial Narrow, and Zapf Dingbats. But fonts are much more than choices in a menu.

Ellen Lupton said, “Typography is what language looks like.” If this is true, then fonts are the tools we use to make language visible and enhance its meaning in type. And what amazing tools they are!

Creating Water Drops on a Surface in Photoshop

Published by | Friday, April 18th, 2014

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In this week’s installment of Pixel Playground, Bert shows us his process for creating water drops on a surface in Photoshop.

Share InDesign presets, workspaces, and custom shortcuts

Published by | Thursday, April 17th, 2014

Saving custom presets, workspaces and shortcuts

Regular InDesign users often build a bank of custom settings: workspaces, scripts, keyboard shortcuts, PDF presets, font sets, and even Find/Change queries. These settings are too valuable to lose in a crash and too important to leave behind if you move to a different computer.

Assign brush strokes to paths in Illustrator

Published by | Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

Assign brush strokes to paths

Uniform strokes can be uniformly dull. But you can transform your vector artwork and give it more of a hand-drawn appearance with Illustrator’s brushes. This week’s episode of Deke’s Techniques takes the Chinese chop you created in the last video and roughs it up a little by assigning brush strokes to paths in Illustrator. Deke shows how to simulate calligraphic lettering and turn your chop into a more authentic-looking stamp, by first transforming the chop into a Smart Object to preserve the original artwork. Click the free video below to get started.

Members of the lynda.com library can watch the two follow-up videos to learn how to to add a paper texture and create a black-on-red variation of their chops. Come back next week to learn how to hide panels that appear by default in Photoshop.

Create realistic reflections and shadows with Photoshop

Published by | Friday, April 11th, 2014

Creating realistic reflections and shadows

This week Bert walks us through creating reflections and shadows cast by the neon tube lights in this store sign.

Reduce your PDF file size

Published by | Thursday, April 10th, 2014

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Ever export a PDF from InDesign and end up with a much larger file than you expected? Why are PDFs sometimes so much larger than they need to be?

Create your own Chinese seal in Illustrator

Published by | Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

Create your own Chinese seal in Illustrator

You can sign your name to your artwork—or better yet, you can stamp it. In this special episode of Deke’s Techniques, Deke shows how to transform your name into a Chinese seal, also known as a chop.