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Prepare for a Multi-camera Shoot: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, December 13th, 2013

Multi-camera shoots

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Last week we explored the benefits of shooting with multiple cameras for a professional video project. It turns out there’s a lot involved when setting up a shoot with multiple DSLR’s- preparation and planning are key. Finding the location that works for you is important, and lighting it for multiple cameras is a challenge.

On this week’s show, Robbie and Rich walk you through the key elements for a multiple DSLR camera shoot. They’re joined by Director of Photography Jim Ball for additional tips. You’ll learn the following:

Prepare for a multi-camera shoot: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, December 6th, 2013

Prepare for a multi-camera shot

Explore DSLR Video Tips at lynda.com.


With the price of cameras dropping lower and lower, using multiple cameras at the same time is a popular production trend. Whether you’re shooting a concert, performance, or how-to video, capturing multiple angles of a shot in perfect sync makes the whole project better. But multi-camera shoots are tricky.

In this week’s DSLR Video Tips, Robbie and Rich show you how to plan for a multi-camera shoot. Director of Photography Jim Ball offers additional insight from his experience with multi-camera shoots.

Using a click track to create a music video: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, November 22nd, 2013

Using a click track to create a music video

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When you’re working on a music video and need to record a commercial or promo that’s tightly tied to a music track, it’s important to think ahead for post-production. Recording with a click track gives you the ability to sync multiple cameras and multiple takes across several locations. Using consistent, sequential audio cues, known as a click track, will help you sync your visuals in post.

On this week’s show, Robbie and Rich walk you through the benefits of using a click track when recording a musical performance.

Fixing the exposure triangle beyond camera settings: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, October 25th, 2013

Fixing the exposure triangle beyond camera settings

Explore DSLR Video Tips at lynda.com.


Throughout the past month, we’ve tackled the exposure triangle—the critical way to get properly exposed photos and videos. Remember your camera and lens have three essential controls that affect how much light comes into the camera: the aperture or opening of the lens, the shutter speed (how long the shutter opens), and the ISO (the sensitivity of your sensor).

But a problem as tough as exposure can still be hard to crack. What happens when you can’t get more light into the camera and the shot is dark? How about when you want shallow depth of field and the shot is overexposed? Sometimes you have to look past the camera and make external changes to get the results you want.

How sensitive is your camera?: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, October 18th, 2013
dslr-video-tips-understanding-iso

Explore DSLR Video Tips at lynda.com.

When you’re talking about exposure, it’s important to know the sensitivity of your camera. A camera’s sensitivity is measured with an ISO unit. The ISO standard is controlled by a technical group called the International Organization for Standardization and it’s the digital equivalent to film speed from days past.

From camera to camera, the native sensitivity will vary. Newer cameras tend to be more sensitive to light thanks to improvements in camera sensors. This means that you can shoot with less available light or use smaller apertures to control depth of field. But if you set your ISO too high, your shot will look grainy or noisy. Learning how to control ISO is the final step in perfecting the exposure triangle.

Mastering shutter speed: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, October 11th, 2013

Master your shutter speed

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Does your footage look too choppy? Are action scenes a streaky mess? It might be because your shutter speed isn’t set properly. The shutter in a camera is a lot like a pair of shutters on a window. It controls how much light comes through and hits the camera’s sensor.

This week, we continue to look at exposure. There are three critical pieces to achieving good exposure and creative control with your shots. Fortunately, shutter speed is the easiest to learn, with just a few simple rules.

Mastering aperture: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, October 4th, 2013

Mastering the Aperture

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How much light does your camera see? The aperture of your camera is its portal to the light in your scene (and without light, there are no pictures or video). Controlling the aperture is essential to getting the right amount of light on to your camera’s sensor to capture the best shots.

There’s another side to aperture as well. As you open the aperture wider, you can narrow the depth of field in your shot, blurring more of the frame outside of your immediate focus area. This is often a hallmark of the “DSLR video” look. Mastering aperture is critical to high-quality video and photos.

Mastering exposure: DSLR Video Tips

Published by | Friday, September 27th, 2013

Mastering the Exposure Triangle


Explore DSLR Video Tips at lynda.com.


When it comes to capturing great images, exposure is critical. Under- or overexpose your shot and you lose precious details. But setting the proper exposure isn’t easy; your light may move behind a cloud, or change over time. When shooting video, exposure requires an almost scientific understanding of light.