Author Archive

Free Creative Inspirations screening Tuesday at UC Berkeley: Richard Koci Hernandez, Multimedia Journalist

Published by | Monday, April 18th, 2011

On Tuesday, April 19th, we’ll be screening Richard Koci Hernandez, Multimedia Journalist on campus at UC Berkeley’s Pacific Film Archive Theatre, located at the Berkeley Art Museum, 2575 Bancroft Way in Berkeley, at 7:00 p.m.

Director Scott Erickson and I will be there to introduce the film. After the screening, Koci will take the stage to be interviewed by Jeremy Rue, a lecturer at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. We’ll have cameras at the event to record Koci’s interview for publication on lynda.com at a later date. Hope to see you there!

Young Love: a tribute to Doyald Young this Sunday

Published by | Friday, April 8th, 2011

A celebration of the life and work of Doyald Young will be held this Sunday, April 10th, from 1:00 until 8:00 p.m. at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California.

It starts from 1:00 to 4:30 p.m. with an afternoon of workshops. Prominent designers and Art Center instructors will show how to draw beautiful curves and letterforms. Join Jill Bell, Stefan G. Bucher, Nils Lindstrom, Ramone Muñoz, Chesley Nassaney, and Bumsuk Lim for a series of hands-on workshops creating luscious curves as an homage to Doyald.

From 5:00 to 6:00 p.m., Doyald’s friends, colleagues, and students will gather in the student cafeteria for an exhibition and reception.

From 6:15 to 8:00 p.m. in the Ahmanson Auditorium, there will be a screening of the lynda.com documentary, Doyald Young, Logotype Designer. After the lights come up, Doyald’s friends and colleagues will share a few of their favorite memories.

RSVP to the event by emailing events@artcenter.edu. Please indicate whether you’ll be attending the workshops, reception, or both. Check for updates to the workshop schedule, descriptions and preparation here.

In honor of this wonderful man, we’d like to share a tribute we created that showcases the work that he loved so much, set to a clarinet duet:

Behind the scenes on location with Hello Design

Published by | Friday, February 25th, 2011

The documentary team is pleased to share some production stills from the just released Creative Inspirations installment about Hello Design. We shot at Hello’s Culver City, California studio that they (of course) designed themselves. It’s a great collaborative space with lots of daylight. It’s also next door to Tea Forest, the popular coffee/tea shop built by CEO David Lai and his wife. Started as more of an experiment, Tea Forest is now a bustling part of their neighborhood. We also shot at a number of locations including the amazing Walt Disney Concert Hall. Because of Hello’s working relationship with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, we were able to get permission to shoot in this architectural marvel as part of our story about the Bravo Gustavo, the iPhone app they developed to promote new conductor Gustavo Dudamel. Enjoy!

Creative Inspirations director Scott Erickson works with cinematographer Jacob K. Cunningham as they set up their next shot at Hello Design's studio.

Creative Inspirations director Scott Erickson works with cinematographer Jacob K. Cunningham as they set up their next shot at Hello Design's studio.

Cinematographer Ben Nilsson is checking camera and audio settings before rolling at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena.

Cinematographer Ben Nilsson is checking camera and audio settings before rolling at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena.

Scott and cinematographer Mia Shimabuku with Hello Design Account Director Scott Arenstein in front of the Walt Disney Concert Hall in downtown Los Angeles.

Scott and cinematographer Mia Shimabuku with Hello Design Account Director Scott Arenstein in front of the Walt Disney Concert Hall in downtown Los Angeles.

Scott and Mia shoot Hello's Scott Arenstein demonstrating their iPhone app (Bravo Gustavo!) while on stage at the Walt Disney Concert Hall.  

Scott and Mia shoot Hello's Scott Arenstein demonstrating their iPhone app (Bravo Gustavo!) while on stage at the Walt Disney Concert Hall.

lynda.com documentary team answers questions from SBIFF audience

Published by | Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

Our last post from this year’s Santa Barbara International Film Festival shows you five of the many faces behind our flagship documentary series, Creative Inspirations. We were honored to have two of our documentaries, Doyald Young, Logotype Designer and Richard Koci Hernandez, Multimedia Journalist chosen as official selections to be screened at the festival.

At the request of the festival, director Scott Erickson and I made ourselves available for questions and answers from the audience. For our premiere evening, we were we joined by editor Tracy Clarke, editor/cinematographer Mia Shimabuku, and co-founder Lynda Weinman. Here’s a rare opportunity to see our team in front of the camera… and to see me wearing a sport jacket.

Happy Valentine’s Day from lynda.com and Marian Bantjes

Published by | Monday, February 14th, 2011

Every year from her home in Vancouver, graphic artist Marian Bantjes creates beautiful Valentine’s Day cards that are sent to a select group of people in her life. Last year’s cards were laser cut from old Christmas cards and surprised even Marian on how spectacular they turned out. This year is no exception.

Follow this (as Doyald Young calls her) intrepid artist as she creates something very special for Valentine’s Day 2011 while the Creative Inspirations cameras were rolling. (A subtle hint about a future installment).

2011 SBIFF Director’s Panel: Directors On Directing

Published by | Thursday, February 10th, 2011

The last, and arguably most important panel of the festival’s second weekend, was the 2011 SBIFF Director’s Panel: Directors On Directing. I don’t know if it was because I arrived early or because I work with lynda.com, but I found myself sitting in the front row. Quite a view.

Moderator Peter Bart from Variety started out with an observation that unlike in previous years, most all of this year’s Oscar nominated films were low budget films, except Pixar’s Toy Story 3, which costs $200 million. Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan was among the highest budgets at a relatively paltry $13 million. Debra Granik’s Winter’s Bone was a slim $2 million and even David O. Russell’s The Fighter weighed in at only $11 million. The directors described how not having money to throw at problems required innovative creative storytelling techniques and in many ways, made the films better.

Since this troupe of directors have been tied together doing the Oscar circuit of award ceremonies and interviews, they talked about how this effects their work and the camaraderie they’ve developed. Their overwhelming desire was to get back to work as soon as possible. In the meantime, they joked about acceptance speeches, not sounding glib, and thanking the people most important to them.

This panel includes:
Darren Aronofsky – Black Swan
Charles Ferguson – Inside Job
Debra Granik – Winter’s Bone
Tom Hooper – The King’s Speech
David O. Russell – The Fighter
Lee Unkrick – Toy Story 3

2011 SBIFF Producer’s Panel: Movers and Shakers

Published by | Tuesday, February 8th, 2011

A great weekend of panels culminated with the 2011 SBIFF  Producer’s Panel: Movers and Shakers.

For obvious reasons, I always feel at one with this panel. Whether the budget is small or large, producers share similar concerns. Whether you’re only shooting for 24 days (Blue Valentine) or as many as 90 (The Social Network), the producers job is the same–we’re here to preserve the director’s vision of our projects and pick the right times to help or stay out of the way. Such is the case with the Academy Award nominated group of films featured in this discussion.

I found particularly fascinating the MPAA ratings battles that continue to rage amongst the filmmakers. The King’s Speech, searching for a broader audience, is seeking a PG-13 rating, though can’t get it because of one scene (you’ll have to see it to know which one). And Blue Valentine fought off an NC-17 rating, winning an appeal to the board with a unanimous vote to overturn.

There was also a lively discussion about making films based on real people and real events as is the case with The Fighter, The Social Network, and The King’s Speech.

This panel includes:
Darla K. Anderson – Toy Story 3
Iain Canning – The King’s Speech
Alix Madigan – Winter’s Bone
Todd Lieberman – The Fighter
Mike Deluca – The Social Network
Jamie Patricof – Blue Valentine

The 2011 SBIFF Women’s Panel now available in the Online Training Library®

Published by | Friday, February 4th, 2011

A great weekend of panels continued with the SBIFF Women’s Panel, Creative Forces: Women in the Business. The panel is now available for all to watch in the Online Training Library®.

This was a very diverse group of women from many areas of filmmaking, including animation, visual effects, costume design, documentary and dramatic film. All are top industry award winners and nominees.

Toy Story 3 producer Darla K. Anderson shared some insights into the four year production cycle at Pixar. The producer of Waiting for Superman, Leslie Chilott, shares how documentary filmmaking can be a powerful tool for social change. And the visual effects producer from world class facility Digital Domain, Gloria Borders, talks about how to get started learning new technologies.

This panel includes:
Darla K. Anderson – Producer, Toy Story 3
Colleen Atwood – Costumer Designer, Alice in Wonderland
Gloria Borders – Executive Visual Effects Producer at Digital Domain (Tron: Legacy)
Leslie Chilcott – Producer, Waiting for Superman
Alix Madigan – Producer, Winter’s Bone