Writing easier code using the jQuery JavaScript library

Published by | Monday, June 4th, 2012

In a nutshell, jQuery is a JavaScript library that helps you get things done. It simplifies the process of accessing the DOM (Document Object Model) and supports older browsers. Let’s take a look at a simple example—say that you have an H2 in your page with an ID of ‘cathead’ and you’ve written it out like this.

 <h2 id="cathead">Consumer Widget</h2> 

If you wanted to modify the code to signify a color change when a person clicks on it, you could set up the code like this with JavaScript:


document.getElementById('cathead').onclick=function () {
  this.style.color='red';
} 

The first step the JavaScript takes is to search the DOM for an element with an ID of  ’cathead’ and then bind an onclick event to it. It then uses the style property to change the color of the element to red. Pretty basic stuff. To do the same thing in jQuery, you’d write something like this:


$('#cathead').click(function() {
  $(this).css("color","red");
});

Other than this code being a lot shorter, the first thing that jQuery does is simplify the process of accessing the DOM. If you look at the two different code examples, you’ll see that jQuery uses the $() variable to gain quick access to elements. The great thing about jQuery is that you can use the $() to access any CSS property, not just IDs.

Let’s look at what happens if we make ‘cathead’ a class instead of an ID element because we have a bunch of headlines that we want to apply the color change to:


<h2 class="cathead">Consumer Widget</h2>
<h2 class="cathead">Another Widget</h2>

jQuery would do it like this:


$('.cathead').click(function() {
  $(this).css("color","red");
}); 

So, with jQuery, instead of selecting an ID, you pass along a class you want to select. You may be thinking that you could just as easily do the same thing by using JavaScript’s getElementByClassName—and you’d be right… sometimes. One main stumbling block is that the getElementsByClassName method is not available in a lot of versions of Internet Explorer, so—plain and simple—some browsers don’t support it. Plus, the getElementsByClassName method returns an array that you have to iterate through in order to modify each instance of the class, which means your code ends up being longer (a lot longer). jQuery on the other hand uses its own methods that are backwards compatible with older browsers and allows you to select the DOM in a variety of ways.

Here’s another example of why I prefer jQuery: While JavaScript has several methods for selecting elements, including the aforementioned getElementById(), getElementsByClassName(), getElementsByTagName() (you can find how well they’re supported in here: http://www.quirksmode.org/dom/w3c_core.html#gettingelements), jQuery only has one.

And that’s not where the magic ends. You can easily select every other element by doing something like this:


<h2 class="cathead">Consumer Widget</h2>
<h2 class="cathead">Another Widget</h2>
<h2 class="cathead">One More Widget</h2>
<h2 class="cathead">Last Widget</h2>
<script>
  $('.cathead:even').css("color","red");
</script>

or you can use its cousin…


$('.cathead:odd').css("color","red");

…which makes it trivial to do zebra striping table rows. Plus, jQuery has methods for animation, and easily building overlays, tabs, and other UI elements.

After you get started with JavaScript, jQuery is an excellent next library to learn. If you’re just getting started, I recommend you check out this week’s episode of View Source where I show you how to use some basic jQuery to build a simple toggle tooltip.

Interested in more?
• The full View Source weekly series on lynda.com
• All web + interactive courses on lynda.com
• All courses from Ray Villalobos on lynda.com

Suggested courses to watch next:
• Create an HTML5 Video Gallery with jQuery
Create an Interactive Map with jQuery
Create an HTML5 Video Gallery with jQuery
Create a Rotating Carousel with jQuery

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One Response to “Writing easier code using the jQuery JavaScript library”

  1. Dheeraj says:

    jQuery really rocks !!!

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