Archive for October, 2010

Happy Halloween from lynda.com!

Published by | Sunday, October 31st, 2010

Just some of the many awesome, gruesome, ghouly, and goofy costumes seen around the offices at lynda.com:

Happy Halloween from lynda.com 2010

Have a safe and fun Halloween!

New Creative Inspirations, new format: Doyald Young, Logotype Designer

Published by | Friday, October 29th, 2010

Since January 2008, the documentary team at lynda.com has brought you into the lives of exemplary creative professionals to afford you a unique opportunity to learn and be inspired by their wisdom and experience. After nearly three years and 23 guests in the Creative Inspirations series, we’re embarking on a new, richer approach to the series and we can’t wait to share it with you!

Until now, we’ve presented short, focused movies covering a broad spectrum of topics that help give insight into the workspace, projects, story, and philosophies of the guests we’ve featured. We’ve now shifted our approach to focus on telling unique stories in a more in-depth and personal way. Our goal is to present a cohesive story that flows from beginning to end with an engaging narrative story—a compelling view into the lives of creative individuals that tell you, in their own words, how and why they became who they are. This allows us to present a complete view of our subjects and allows you to experience it the same way you would as if you’re watching documentary film. For ease of viewing online, we are offering two ways to view the documentary: all together as one piece or as smaller sections (like DVD chapters).

Today, we are releasing our first documentary in this new format: Doyald Young, Logotype Designer. From humble beginnings in a small Texas town eight decades ago, Young shares his story, which is as elegant as his script fonts and as wise as his set of Oxford English dictionaries. Enjoy a window into the life of this accomplished artisan as he works with joyous focus in his favorite spot, his drawing table, and follow Young to Art Center College of Design in Pasadena where he shares his talents with tomorrow’s designers. Young recalls the hundreds of iterations he went through in creating the logo for Prudential, and he puts pencil to tissue creating the pages for his next book about script lettering, Learning Curves.

We have greatly appreciated the feedback you’ve generously offered about Creative Inspirations and we look forward to hearing from you more as we evolve this new approach. We will continue to offer you wonderful stories and imagery that educate, entertain and most of all, inspire.

Behind the scenes at the Doyald Young shoot

Published by | Friday, October 29th, 2010

Doyald Young
Staff editor/cinematographer Tracy Clark on location at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena shooting for our Creative Inspirations documentary about Doyald Young. Doyald is reviewing an assignment with one of his typography students.

Doyald Young
Creative Inspirations series director Scott Erickson reviews his next shot with Doyald Young at his home workspace. Cinematographer and digital lead Ben Nilsson looks on.

Doyald Young
In the Art Center classroom, Scott chats with Doyald between shots. Ben and Tracy discuss camera settings in the background.

Doyald Young
Scott sets up our Canon 7D DSLR mounted with a Canon 24-70mm f2.8, shooting at 24fps to capture Doyald working at his favorite place—his drawing board.

Illustrator CS5 One-on-One: Advanced preview—Phase six: Scaling and editing

Published by | Friday, October 29th, 2010

Phase six: Scaling and editing traced artwork

In this exclusive preview of his upcoming Illustrator CS5 One-on-One: Advanced course, lynda.com author Deke McClelland shares six phases in the creation of an authentic five-by-three-foot pirate flag. In this last episode, Deke uses Illustrator to enlarge, recolor, and edit a group of paths to create a finished piece of art. Look for the full course to be released in its entirety later this year.

Topics include:
• Using the Scale tool to resize a piece of art
• Selecting and recoloring a collection of paths
• Moving a few subpaths to perfect a piece of art

Part one: Sketching
Part two: Editing scanned line art
Part three: Adding contrast and color
Part four: Live trace and resolution
Part five: Expanding and separating artwork

Bert Monroy reveals his latest digital masterpiece, Times Square

Published by | Thursday, October 28th, 2010

lynda.com author and digital painter Bert Monroy with his latest work.

Today, lynda.com author and digital painter Bert Monroy publicly revealed his latest (and massive!) digital painting entitled Times Square at the PhotoPlus Expo conference in New York.

Bert Monroy's Time Square

Bert Monroy's Time Square.

Bert has been working on this hyper-realistic illustration for four years, and says he’s not quite done with it yet. It is the largest image he’s ever created, and it definitely pushed the boundaries of the software and hardware he had available to use. Every element has been meticulously created from scratch using Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. The 5 foot by 25 foot image is filled with the likenesses of Bert’s family, friends and scores of luminaries from the imaging and creative industry—including our very own Lynda Weinman, Bruce Heavin, Deke McClelland, David Blatner, Chris Murphy, and Colleen Wheeler.

Standing next to John Loiacono of Adobe are our own Bruce Heavin and Lynda Weinman.

A 25-foot light box was constructed to display the piece that has been printed on a new material being introduced by Epson called DisplayTrans Backlight Media that Bert helped develop. If you are in New York, you can get up close and the incredible detail for yourself by visiting the Epson booth at PhotoPlus Expo being held at the Javits Convention Center through Saturday, October 30, 2010. Alternatively, you can pan and zoom in on an online version of the piece.

Some interesting facts:

• The image size is 60 inches by 300 inches.
• The flattened file weighs in at 6.52 gigabytes.
• The painting is composed of almost 3,000 individual Photoshop and Illustrator files.
• Taking a cumulative total of all the files, the overall image contains over 500,000 layers.

We are thrilled to also let you know that Bert will begin production on a Making of Time Square video course later this month, which is likely to be published early next year. Until then, you can find out more about the incredibly talented Bert by watching the Creative Inspirations documentary we published on him earlier this year.

Illustrator CS5 One-on-One: Advanced preview—Phase five: Expanding and separating artwork

Published by | Thursday, October 28th, 2010

Phase five: Expanding and separating artwork

In this exclusive preview of his upcoming Illustrator CS5 One-on-One: Advanced course, lynda.com author Deke McClelland shares six phases in the creation of an authentic five-by-three-foot pirate flag. In today’s episode, Deke uses Illustrator to expand, separate, and prepare a piece of artwork for output to any medium. Look for the full course to be released in its entirety later this year. Phase six will be online tomorrow.

Topics include:
• Expanding a Live Trace object into path outlines
• Separating commonly colored paths to a layer
• Resizing the artboard and creating a full bleed

Part one: Sketching
Part two: Editing scanned line art
Part three: Adding contrast and color
Part four: Live trace and resolution

Illustrator CS5 One-on-One: Advanced preview—Phase four: Live trace and resolution

Published by | Wednesday, October 27th, 2010

Phase four: Live trace and resolution

In this exclusive preview of his upcoming Illustrator CS5 One-on-One: Advanced course, lynda.com author Deke McClelland shares six phases in the creation of an authentic five-by-three-foot pirate flag. In today’s episode, Deke prepares the base artwork for tracing in Photoshop and auto-traces it in Illustrator. Look for the full course to be released in its entirety later this year. Phase five will be online tomorrow.

Topics include:
• Saving a piece of art for placement in Illustrator
• Placing pixel-based images in Illustrator
• Applying the Live Trace feature

Part one: Sketching
Part two: Editing scanned line art
Part three: Adding contrast and color

Illustrator CS5 One-on-One: Advanced preview—Phase three: Adding contrast and color

Published by | Tuesday, October 26th, 2010

Phase three: Adding contrast and color

In this exclusive preview of his upcoming Illustrator CS5 One-on-One: Advanced course, lynda.com author Deke McClelland shares six phases in the creation of an authentic five-by-three-foot pirate flag. In today’s episode, Deke uses Photoshop to make the base line art into three colors: rich black, blood red, and page white, with no dust or scratch in between. Look for the full course to be released in its entirety later this year. Phase four will be online tomorrow.

Topics include:

• Editing artwork and filling in missing details
• Flipping a drawing to reveal its defects
• Reforming artwork with the Liquify command

Part one: Sketching
Part two: Editing scanned line art